More games should have soundtracks like Transistor

With Destiny out, and the majority of my time spent playing it for now, it hasn’t left me with a massive desire to occupy myself with much else. I appreciate it is quite a bit of the old same, rinse and repeat and grind to death. But as long as I am enjoying it, and have the friends to play it with, I’m happy. Although I don’t think it’s going to change much up to the next DLC.

However, I am not here to talk about Destiny. I’m here to highlight what you’re potentially missing out on whilst playing other games, and that is the Transistor Soundtrack. I’ve played a fair few games in my time, and some I have loved the music that goes with it but thought nothing more bar it’s pleasantness whilst I play away, maybe even getting a copy of the theme song along the way. To which Borderland’s rendition with Cage the Elephant comes to mind and “No Rest for the Wicked”. Everyone will have different tastes, thus not every soundtrack will be for everyone. But if you enjoyed Transistor, a part to do with it would have been the music hitting away in the background. One that I personally thought was perfect to match the ambience of the game.

The role of music and sound within Transistor, for those who haven’t played it, was crucial to how it felt when being played. With the antagonist, Red, losing her voice and only being able to hum melodically to the background at the touch of a button. There are also moments within the game where the music kicks in as hoards of enemies hit the screen, or when the back drop opens up in front of your very eyes to visually blow you away, a song will just drop and the only way to describe it is sensational.

What also makes it somewhat of a standout kind of thing, is the ability to play the soundtrack outside of the game, and still enjoy it. My favourite track being “We All Become”,  where I’m happy to just stick it on a playlist at any point, whether I’m driving or choosing something to listen to for background music, and it just fits. But also, for me, it triggers of when I remember hearing that music within the game, which is quite powerful when you think about it.

If a title like Transistor can do it, shouldn’t more do it as well? Because I sure as hell would like to see more games with such gripping OST’s that make the game to me, more memorable.

Which comes for me to ask, what game sound tracks have had a similar effect on you? Or do you have a favourite track from the game?

  • Michael Scoates

    There was a fan fic competition once to win the OST to Phantasy Star Universe which I won because a) I loved the soundtrack and b) I put in a LOT of effort with my entry to win it. Many forget that whilst online no longer exists there’s still the single player side of the game too, cracking in its own right. There are dungeons you explore where the music is absolutely perfect, and if you get the grind down pat you can can even fight alongside to it and time your finish moves to match the crescendos you know are coming.

    Gearbox were responsible for getting me into The Heavy and Nero, the former’s Short Change Hero used for Borderland 2’s opening and the latter’s Doomsday used in one of Borderland 2’s trailers.

    Probably the most iconic pieces of music for me from videogames is Final Fantasy’s famous arpeggio, instantly recognisable, instantly reviving great memories of all my time spent with the series.

    I also own Harold Faltermeyer’s OST for Two Worlds. I guess my love for the RPG genre is evident.

  • Michael Scoates

    There was a fan fic competition once to win the OST to Phantasy Star Universe which I won because a) I loved the soundtrack and b) I put in a LOT of effort with my entry to win it. Many forget that whilst online no longer exists there’s still the single player side of the game too, cracking in its own right. There are dungeons you explore where the music is absolutely perfect, and if you get the grind down pat you can can even fight alongside to it and time your finish moves to match the crescendos you know are coming.

    Gearbox were responsible for getting me into The Heavy and Nero, the former’s Short Change Hero used for Borderland 2’s opening and the latter’s Doomsday used in one of Borderland 2’s trailers.

    Probably the most iconic pieces of music for me from videogames is Final Fantasy’s famous arpeggio, instantly recognisable, instantly reviving great memories of all my time spent with the series.

    I also own Harold Faltermeyer’s OST for Two Worlds. I guess my love for the RPG genre is evident.

  • Michael Scoates

    There was a fan fic competition once to win the OST to Phantasy Star Universe which I won because a) I loved the soundtrack and b) I put in a LOT of effort with my entry to win it. Many forget that whilst online no longer exists there’s still the single player side of the game too, cracking in its own right. There are dungeons you explore where the music is absolutely perfect, and if you get the grind down pat you can can even fight alongside to it and time your finish moves to match the crescendos you know are coming.

    Gearbox were responsible for getting me into The Heavy and Nero, the former’s Short Change Hero used for Borderland 2’s opening and the latter’s Doomsday used in one of Borderland 2’s trailers.

    Probably the most iconic pieces of music for me from videogames is Final Fantasy’s famous arpeggio, instantly recognisable, instantly reviving great memories of all my time spent with the series.

    I also own Harold Faltermeyer’s OST for Two Worlds. I guess my love for the RPG genre is evident.