10 Reasons For A Second Play Through of Dragon Age: Inquisition

I have finally completed Dragon Age: Inquisition… well, I’ve completed a tonne of the side-quests and I’ve finished the main story (as well as killing all of the High Dragons and reaching the lofty heights of level 27). My first play through was as a warrior dwarf, and he was an absolute beast – despite his lack of stature. But, after completing the game I longed for something more. I wanted to play it again, but as a different character and different class. But I have other reasons for starting all over again as well, and here they are!

A change of pace…

After spending the past God-knows-how-long of gameplay as a dwarf warrior, I kind of fancied a change. I not only wanted to experience the game as a different class, I also fancied seeing the rich world from the perspective of a different race. I spent much of my time in Dragon Age: Inquisition at the butt end of short jokes, as people couldn’t believe a tiny dwarf was the head of the Inquisition. I also spent much of my time marvelling at awkward encounters, where other characters had to slouch to speak to me, or physically bend over to dance or lock lips with my character. In all, I thought it would be nice to see the world from the average height, so I chose to start over as an elf. Not only that, but my backstory has changed and NPCs seem to treat me differently as well; mocking me less for my stature and more for my pointy ears.

A change of combat…

Whilst running around, maniacally swinging a great axe, war hammer or great-sword was fun, it did lack some level of finesse. Hacking and slashing my way through the bad guys was nice, but I always enjoyed taking control of my mage party member, predominantly Solas, and blasting the enemy with fire spells, freezing them with ice spells or protecting my party with barriers and the likes. So I’ve decided to mix the game up and take my character out of the heat of battle, and move him to the outskirts as a mage. Here I can watch my party hack and slash the enemy to death whilst I remain at a relatively safe distance casting spells. It’s given the combat a new lease of life for me,  and it’s allowed me to see the ‘battlefield’ from a new perspective.

Make different choices…

Inquisition is all about the choices. I made quite a few of them in my first play through, and I’d definitely like to see how the game turns out if I had made different choices. The decisions come at you so thick and fast that it’s hard to keep track, so it’ll be nice to really sit and consider my decisions, and not have to worry about the next quest or where the story is going – because I already know!

And act on hindsight…

It’s kind of similar to the last point, but still, I’d love to make different decisions knowing what I know now. I made so many little choices in the game, which all ended up having a slightly bigger impact than I first thought. For instance, I slowly drove Sera away from me by making decisions to please Solas; this ended up with me disliking Sera and removing her from my party. It wasn’t necessarily her fault, it was just because I wanted to make ol’ grumpy Solas happy. Knowing what I know now, I don’t think I’d have bothered so much. But, I even ended up regretting choices over where to spend Inquisition Points! On my second play through, I’m going to be a little more conservative about my choices and think about how they’ll effect the bigger picture for both my character, and the overall story.

Back-track on missed quests…

Following on from the hindsight point, it would be nice to play some of the missions that I missed due to my decisions. For instance, I never got to see how siding with the Mages turns out, because I accidentally sided with Templars. I’d have liked to have played that mission, so I will this time round.

Create relationships with different characters…

In the game you are able to pursue a romantic relationship. Whilst this isn’t necessary, it does give you the opportunity to take part in special relationship quests that you would otherwise miss out on. It’s a chance to develop the story a lot further, to learn some more about the key characters and to gain a little more XP. For me, I’d quite like to choose a different ‘romantic partner’ just to see what their relationship story will be. I’m still not sure who the lucky lady will be… maybe Morgan… if it’s possible of course.

Fight with a different party of allies…

I know that you can do this at any point in your play through anyway, but I got to a point where I found a team that really worked, and complimented my main character. By that time, I couldn’t be bothered to introduce other characters to the party because I didn’t fancy levelling them up and spending their points. Also, I really enjoyed the banter between characters like Iron Bull (who is a badass and will definitely feature in my new party) and Sera.

Experience a different specialisation class

I chose to become a ‘Champion’ for my dwarf warrior, but it wasn’t an easy choice. I wanted to know what the other classes would be like, I only ended up choosing by going through the side-quests and seeing which one I would be able to do quickest. So, I’m looking forward to experiencing a different specialisation class as a mage – which one will I go for? The jury’s still out.

Enjoy the lore and the characters a little more…

Because I had gotten a little set in my ways, and was too focused on levelling up and beating the game, I tended to ignore some of the intricate relationships between NPCs and playable characters as well. Not only that, but I eventually collected so many codex entries that I couldn’t quite keep up. So, this time round, I’m going to really experience the characters and the conversations, and I’m going to read up on the lore whenever I find a codex entry.

You get to create, and fall in love, with a completely new character…

I’ve saved the best till last. For me, creating a character, developing their personality and eventually growing to love them is my favourite part of any choice based RPG. I always love creating the characters and I always end up deciding what sort of character they’ll be before I’ve even started the game. My dwarf was an all round nice-guy, sound in mind and quite reasonable. My elf character, however, is going to be hot-headed and irrational… and a bit of a dick. I realise that, judging them by their race, these personalities should probably be switched – but I like to be ironic.

  • GotNews4Ya

    I have heard that a lot of the decisions made don’t impact the game towards the end, and only a few do.. or they just change a few little things about it.. I ran my play through with a Mage, the abilities were a big turn off for me.. They took a lot out of the game (spell wise) and they lead on that this game had so many more spells to choose from, while that is definitely not the case. It seemed extremely limited, and their was no way to make it more powerful, or know what spell is best.. It was messy for sure. I ended up being a Knight Enchanter.. but I didn’t pick somewhat until the end of my journey.. I also played all the High Dragons.. and after 120+ hrs into the game, I felt satisfied enough to walk away, I wasn’t happy with all my end decisions.. but then again.. I don’t really think you can be..

    Good Article, How many hours did you end with? I found by the end of my character.. that I was just Auto Specing them with Abilities.. because nothing else really made that big of a difference.. I had all the heavy hitting abilities.. and that was the biggest turn off.. Dragon Age: Origins was so much more diverse when it came to spells.. I think they need to rework this area.. when it comes to the next Dragon Age.. It was REALLY LACKING

    • The decisions that you make, in general, don’t effect the ending of the game. It does effect the way that the ending of the game plays out, though. For instance, depending on whether you drank from a certain well impacts how the ending plays out quite dramatically. Obviously, it doesn’t make a different ending, but it does make the ending unique to your play-through. It’s kind of the same as Telltale’s Walking Dead series in that your decisions don’t effect the end result, but it does change how you get there (just on a less obvious scale).

      I ended my first play through with 112 hours – but there are a few more quests I could do with the character if I wanted to. I agree with your point about the mages, though. I’ve only played a few hours with this character so far, but I can see myself finding the spells a little repetitive.

  • GotNews4Ya

    I have heard that a lot of the decisions made don’t impact the game towards the end, and only a few do.. or they just change a few little things about it.. I ran my play through with a Mage, the abilities were a big turn off for me.. They took a lot out of the game (spell wise) and they lead on that this game had so many more spells to choose from, while that is definitely not the case. It seemed extremely limited, and their was no way to make it more powerful, or know what spell is best.. It was messy for sure. I ended up being a Knight Enchanter.. but I didn’t pick somewhat until the end of my journey.. I also played all the High Dragons.. and after 120+ hrs into the game, I felt satisfied enough to walk away, I wasn’t happy with all my end decisions.. but then again.. I don’t really think you can be..

    Good Article, How many hours did you end with? I found by the end of my character.. that I was just Auto Specing them with Abilities.. because nothing else really made that big of a difference.. I had all the heavy hitting abilities.. and that was the biggest turn off.. Dragon Age: Origins was so much more diverse when it came to spells.. I think they need to rework this area.. when it comes to the next Dragon Age.. It was REALLY LACKING

    • The decisions that you make, in general, don’t effect the ending of the game. It does effect the way that the ending of the game plays out, though. For instance, depending on whether you drank from a certain well impacts how the ending plays out quite dramatically. Obviously, it doesn’t make a different ending, but it does make the ending unique to your play-through. It’s kind of the same as Telltale’s Walking Dead series in that your decisions don’t effect the end result, but it does change how you get there (just on a less obvious scale).

      I ended my first play through with 112 hours – but there are a few more quests I could do with the character if I wanted to. I agree with your point about the mages, though. I’ve only played a few hours with this character so far, but I can see myself finding the spells a little repetitive.